MTA Escalator Accident Could Have Been Avoided

A new report from the MTA shows transit mechanics ignored repairs on an escalator in Midtown that broke down last February. The top steps of an escalator at the Fifth Avenue-53rd Street subway station were shredded to pieces during rush hour. No one was seriously injured, and a safety mechanism stopped the escalator before passengers were dragged into the pit of twisted metal. However, the escalator was full of commuters at the time and left many feeling they had nearly stepped into the teeth of disaster. 

The escalator was ignored for six months by transit mechanics who were supposed to make sure it was safe, said a report released by the MTA inspector general. The audit says the worn parts on the escalator weren’t noticed because of “preventive maintenance visits which NYC Transit either canceled or did not complete.”

MISSED INSPECTIONS

The MTA’s Inspector General released a scathing report earlier this month on the Transit Authority’s escalator maintenance program, noting that a lack of work and accountability led to the escalator accident last year. She notes six months had gone by without scheduled maintenance on the escalator at the subway stop and parts just wore out over time until the escalator broke, endangering passengers. Preventive maintenance was scheduled on four separate dates between August 2018 and January 2019, but the maintenance was either canceled or left incomplete each time. According to the superintendent responsible for that station and the maintenance of that escalator, his team was severely understaffed. The MTA at the time vowed to inspect all 231 escalators in its system beginning right after the incident.

Part of the problem, the Inspector General report says, though, is that the MTA keeps no comprehensive records on escalator maintenance. There is no management report that captures an individual escalator’s history of canceled, delayed or incomplete preventative maintenance visits. This means that a manager can’t easily see the impact of a missed maintenance call. To check the maintenance history of any one escalator, management currently has to compile and analyze data from two separate sources, the report says. Subway supervisors also have no way of knowing when maintenance work on escalators is skipped or rescheduled — but MTA officials promised the IG’s office they would quickly put a tracking system in place.

MOVING FORWARD

Following last year’s wreck, the MTA has already begun to make some changes. They have hired more mechanics and helpers and have taken significant steps to overhaul their escalator maintenance program, revamping the process when it comes to the frequency of maintenance work. They have also started to roll out mobile devices to record maintenance work in real time. Other steps they’ve taken include a full review of how they compensate difficult-to-find tradespeople, and the development of a special training class to help managers in the field run reports- to improve operations. Additionally, New York City Transit responded to the Office of the Inspector General’s findings and accepted all its recommendations. The have issued a directive describing the circumstances under which preventive maintenance can be cancelled or deferred and established a new protocol so scheduled maintenance cannot be cancelled for an escalator that did not receive its preventive maintenance visit the prior month. New York City Transit says they will implement all the changes recommended by the inspector general by the end of the year.

FIELDBOSS stays current on industry trends to keep you informed on what’s happening in the elevator world. Read our blog and sign up for our newsletter for all the latest news.

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HFC Emissions Are Actually Increasing, Plus the Future of Refrigerants

Ideally, after the global phasedown of hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) refrigerant gases, we would all transition to a refrigerant technology that would never have to be replaced again. Climate hawks often describe hydrofluorocarbons as a kind of white rhino, a rare area of policy that everyone — industry, environmentalists, Democrats, Republicans — can agree on.

After replacing HFCs, some are trying to sell the idea that it is possible come up with a “future-proof” solution that would ensure no further disruptions or further regulations. In reality, it’s unrealistic to think that there is a silver bullet of refrigerants.

INCREASING EMISSIONS

What’s more, according to a new study by the journal Nature Communications shows that hydrofluorocarbon emissions actually appear to be growing at record values. The study contradicts previous predictions that hydrofluorocarbon emissions would drop by around 90% from 2015 to 2017.

Two years after China and India pledged to reduce HFC emissions in factories that produce the gas, the countries reported that they had almost wholly eliminated HFC-23 emission. However, in 2018, not only did HFC-23 emissions increase, but they reached an all-time high. Why is this? The study finds that it is very likely that China has not been as successful in reducing HFC-23 emissions as reported. Without additional measurements, it is hard to know whether India has been able to implement its abatement programme.

Expectedly, the new findings have a massive implication on the Kigali Amendment. While the Kigali amendment does not yet bind China and India, their reported reduction would have put them on course to be consistent with Kigali. Had the emissions reductions been as large as reported, the researchers estimate that the equivalent of a whole year of Spain’s CO2 emissions could have been avoided between 2015 and 2017. However, it looks like there is still work to do.

HFC ALTERNATIVES

Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) were invented in the 1930s, and due to their safety and efficiency, became the standard. In the 1980s, as their negative environmental impact on the ozone layer became known, the industry met the challenge with HFCs, which have no ozone layer impact. Today’s challenge is to address HFCs’ potential climate impact. Once again, the industry is ready to provide safer and more efficient solutions.

The new generation of choices available today all have a reduced impact on climate, but also come with their set of drawbacks. All of them, including those marketed as “natural refrigerants,” are in fact factory-made. Ammonia and HFOs are synthesized in chemical reactors. Hydrocarbons are petrochemicals produced by cracking in oil and gas refineries, and CO2is a purified industrial gas. Ammonia is highly toxic, hydrocarbons are highly flammable or explosive, and CO2 requires very high operating pressure, complicated controls, and may not be efficient in all climates. All must also be further refined to meet the purity requirements of today’s equipment. All consume raw materials and energy and produce waste when manufactured. All must be packaged and transported. The user must decide which trade-offs they can accommodate to best meet their needs.

THE FUTURE

Can any of the above solutions provide us with a future free of disruption? If you have to deal with ammonia leaks, hydrocarbon-related explosions, systems breaking down, or complex systems that are hard for users to adopt or transition to, your business will be disrupted. Although we know the global HVACR industry will continue to improve, it’s impossible to call any solution “future proof”. Advances in science and the industry will continue to push new innovations forward in order to maximize efficiency over the lifespan of our equipment, while keeping a focus on the environment and safety.

FIELDBOSS stays current on industry trends to keep you informed on what’s happening in the HVACR world. Read our blog and sign up for our newsletter for all the latest news.

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Serving Cannabis Industry Poses Challenges for HVACR Contractors

Cannabis Industry

When it comes to growing marijuana, a controlled environment is pretty much everything. From heat and humidity to ventilation and air quality, the HVAC industry goes hand in hand with cannabis growing facilities. The cannabis industry shows potential for massive growth as an in-demand product becomes accessible to millions of consumers, but it also faces the uncertainty common to any growing segment. Yet despite facing many challenges, contractors remain optimistic about the marijuana grow industry.

Technical Challenges:

Temperature and Humidity – When growing cannabis, you can’t underestimate the importance of an HVAC system. A good HVAC system regulates temperature, humidity and air quality. An HVAC system also regulates airflow, provides ventilation and can increase technology in grow rooms, depending on how sophisticated the system. An HVAC system for a cultivation facility isn’t like other HVAC systems. Cultivators have specific needs, and building and running a proper system catered to cannabis isn’t that simple. Too little or too much humidity will spoil the crop. They’re some of the most demanding environments to try to condition. HVAC contractors need to get the systems right because of the money at stake if it fails and the crops suffer. 

Energy Consumption – Grow rooms are also extremely energy intensive. In addition to needing powerful HVAC systems to keep temperature and humidity within range, they also require an incredible amount of energy for specialized lighting. The lights are often on 24-hours a day.

Odor Management – With a high concentration of marijuana plants, grow rooms are notorious for producing an overwhelming aroma within a small space. One of the biggest municipal issues contractors face is odor control. Cannabis emits an extremely pungent smell, and this arises as the biggest objection among neighbors during the vetting of a proposal. HVAC contractors must assure their clients they can control the smell.

Business Challenges

Cash Crops – All this equipment and service comes at a cost, but access to banking has been a major issue for the cannabis industry. As the cannabis industry grows, the shortage of financial services for cannabis companies has become more of a headache. It’s not as simple as walking into a bank and opening an account. At first, banks were unwilling to work with growers and sellers because while sales may have been legal in the state, the proceeds remained illegal at the federal level. More banks today serve the industry. But growers still have limited options. Those banks only have a select number of accounts and often charge high fees for those services.

The banking situation, however, does show signs of improvement. Congress is considering bills to expand bank access for the industry. The Treasury Department already eased restrictions for banks, allowing them to work with cannabis companies as long as they produce enhanced transaction reports. More growth funding today comes from traditional investors, such as private equity firms, that pay out of existing funds rather than cash from sales. However, until legislation like the SAFE Banking Act, which is currently in the House of Representatives, shifts the headwinds, cannabis companies will continue to have limited access to financial products most businesses take for granted.

Levels of Regulation – Where is marijuana legal in the U.S.? With every state but three legalizing marijuana in at least some form, the US is a little bit greener than a few years ago. Now there are numerous different state laws on the legalization of recreational marijuana. Legal states like California and Colorado offer widely available dispensaries, while in places like Alabama and Georgia, which are technically medical marijuana states, possession still may lead to felonies.

States making the transition to allowing recreational use, rather than just medical use, are still struggling with implementation. For example, Michigan decriminalized marijuana in 2018 and started allowing recreational sales on Dec. 1, but a majority of cities, including Detroit, have banned recreational dispensaries.Many expected a building boom when California’s recreational regulations went into place. That didn’t happen. Instead, shops opened without any cultivators licensed to supply them. This caused issues with HVAC contractors being paid, since the customers found themselves without cash flow.

Many operators in the cannabis business started out when the entire field was illegal. Contractors now need to insist on following every rule to the letter. There are still plenty of unlicensed operations. Contractors must check to make sure their clients have proper licensing from both the state and the local municipality. Most states maintain an accessible database, but verifying the local license often proves more challenging. 

Challenges aside, once a grower finds a contractor they trust to take care of them, they are likely to be quite loyal. Growers will have very high-tech equipment and they will pay a premium to maintain it. 

FIELDBOSS stays current on industry trends to keep you informed on what’s happening in the HVACR world.  Read our blog and sign up for our newsletter  for all the latest news

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Ottawa Announces New Carbon Tax Rebate Programs

Federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change Catherine McKenna unveiled two carbon tax rebate programs for the four Canadian provinces charged with Ottawa’s carbon tax. They will get back a portion of that money in the form of rebates for small- and medium-sized businesses implementing energy-efficient projects.

Proceeds from the fuel charge imposed on Manitoba, New Brunswick, Ontario and Saskatchewan will unlock $1.45 billion over the next five years — though, for some, this is just not enough.

Details of the first stream of funding, the Climate Action Incentive Fund (CAIF) SME Project, were released on May 30. The funds would cover up to 25 per cent of the cost of larger, energy-efficient retrofit projects, such as building retrofits, fuel switching and renewable energy production, for example. Details on the second stream — the CAIF Rebate program — will be released in June. The program would cover between 25 and 50 per cent of eligible costs of specified energy-efficient appliances, such as heating and cooling equipment. The minister expects the rebate will be limited to a maximum amount of $20,000 per applicant.

Another $10 million in funding will be made available through the Low Carbon Economy Fund Partnerships program for small businesses taking on smaller projects, with funding levels ranging between $20,000 and $250,000.

These carbon tax rebate programs are subject to Royal Assent of the Budget Implementation Act and subsequent decisions from the Minister of Finance.

Over the next year, $150 million in rebates will be made available, based on the percentage of revenue collected within each province. Still, the Canadian Federation of Independent Businesses (CFIB) is underwhelmed. The organization says the funding will “do little to relieve small businesses of the financial burden imposed by the carbon tax.”

More than half a million small businesses in Canada are affected by the national carbon price in the four covered provinces. CFIB has called on the federal government to axe the carbon tax — or provide businesses with “rebates equal to the amount they will pay.”

“Small- and medium-sized businesses are now in the position of having to spend even more money just to get a fraction of their carbon taxes back,” said CFIB President Dan Kelly. “This is simply too little, too late for small firms. Nothing short of a full rebate equal to the amount they will spend in carbon taxes would be satisfactory.”

FIELDBOSS stays current on industry trends to keep you informed on what’s happening in the HVACR world. Read our blog and sign up for our newsletter for all the latest news.

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Women in HVACR: A Growing Trend

During a time when the HVAC industry is struggling to find enough qualified service technicians and installers, women, without a doubt, represent the largest underutilized resource available to the industry. As of 2017, women made up nearly 47 percent of the U.S. labor force. In HVACR, however, that number is significantly lower. Of the 448,000 Americans employed in 2017 as HVACR mechanics and installers, just 2 percent of those were women, according to the U.S. BLS. However, while the HVACR industry has traditionally been male-dominated, women are starting to have their own successes as both owners and technicians.

Women in HVACR Trends

Just 10 years ago, it was fairly rare to see a female working on industrial air conditioning and exceedingly rare for one to own their own contracting business. But times are changing.

Today, more women are entering the field, thanks to advocacy, personal encouragement, and mentoring, and increasing numbers of girls pursuing the STEM fields early on in their academic career. Recruitment efforts within the industry are also gaining steam, thanks to organizations like Women in HVACR, a national organization dedicated to increasing the number of women in the industry. Women in HVACR provides support, mentorship, scholarships, and helps women break into the industry. Through the organization, they connect with schools and help to make the HVAC industry less of a mystery while encouraging women to consider it as a career choice.

Meanwhile, HVAC companies themselves are trying to assist women in making the transition by hosting career fairs, awarding scholarships, and helping to support women new to the field. Additionally, many trades schools, local and federal governments, and private institutions are helping to make it easier for women to train for jobs in AC maintenance, industrial air conditioning, and more.

Some other trends the industry is seeing is more daughters taking over family-owned HVACR businesses passed down from their fathers. Additionally, there is a growing rate of professional positions being filled by females; More women in every position, at every level, from manufacturing to service providers, and from wholesalers to educators. There has also been an increase in women in the HVACR programs at technical schools.

As more women take the helm of major HVAC contracting companies, they are presenting themselves as positive role models for other women and proving that the job isn’t “just for men.”

The Industry Needs Women

The HVAC industry is projected to grow significantly in the next few years. Continued industry growth combined with the estimated retirement of a large percentage of older HVAC employees means the industry needs women to survive. The industry will need about 115,000 new workers trained and ready to work by 2022 just to meet the expected demand of this aging industry. Attracting women into the industry will help fill the need for HVAC professionals. This starts at the high school level, informing students of the opportunities available with a two-year trade degree as opposed to a four-year college degree.

An Untapped Resource

One HVAC company said one of the biggest changes to her business was hiring female technicians. The majority of her customers are women because usually the men are gone and the moms are at home. Women relate to women and in some cases, feel safer having a female technician in the home. The company says that now a lot of their competitors are continuously trying to recruit the female techs.

 

Not every challenge of being a woman in a primarily male industry has been lifted, but the HVACR industry continues to further open its doors to women seeking a stable, well-paying career. With the increasing open-mindedness and equality, career opportunities, ownership abilities, and established support systems in place, more women are starting to take notice and consider the HVACR industry as a career. As the skilled trades shortage grows larger each day, it’s imperative to begin changing the perception of a woman’s ability to excel in the trade professions. For HVACR businesses to continue to grow they need to find enough quality employees for the future. Owners must look outside the industry’s preconceived idea of what a service technician looks like. It is exciting to see this transformation beginning to take place and to see more women getting involved and succeeding in the HVACR world.

FIELDBOSS stays current on industry trends to keep you informed on what’s happening in the HVACR world. Read our blog and sign up for our newsletter for all the latest news.

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TSSA Receives Failing Grade from Auditor General Over Elevator Safety

Last week, Bonnie Lysyk, Ontario’s Auditor General, released her annual report. It stated that the TSSA, the agency responsible for inspecting Ontario elevators, is failing to meet its mandate to protect public safety.  Lysyk says the Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) is doing little to tackle real elevator safety issues. Ontario’s PC government has now directed the TSSA to take immediate steps and produce an action plan by Jan. 31, 2019 in response to the report.

 

Large elevator maintenance companies
Lysyk says that the TSSA lacks the appropriate enforcement powers to deal with big elevator companies. A small number of these companies dominate Ontario’s market and for years have been failing to maintain most of Ontario’s operating elevators in accordance with safety laws. The TSSA has tried with little result to have these large elevator maintenance companies perform required maintenance and safety tests. It has repeatedly prosecuted the same large maintenance company, resulting in guilty verdicts and fines over $1 million However, in 2018, 93% of the inspected elevators maintained by this company in regions related to the prosecutions failed to pass their latest TSSA inspection. Shockingly, five of these elevators are located in a Toronto hospital.

TSSA oversight
In her annual report, Lysyk criticized the TSSA for poor oversight. It noted that most elevators and escalators in the province fail to comply with safety laws. The report stated, “We found cases where the TSSA has focused on areas where it can recover its costs even though its activities have little effect on public safety, and we found other areas in which the TSSA does not generate revenue from licensing fees and where it has done little to enforce public safety, even though risks to public safety exist.”

TSSA’s outdated computer system
Lysyk also called out the TSSA’s outdated computer system. It “contains inconsistent and incomplete information about the safety status of devices and businesses that it regulates,” she wrote. “TSSA’s licensing system does not communicate with the system that captures inspection information,” she explained. “As a result, in 2018, the TSSA renewed the operating licences of over 300 elevators that at the same time were still shut down by the TSSA for being unsafe to operate.”

80% of elevators in Ontario failed inspections in 2018
In 2018, just over 80% of elevators failed their TSSA inspection, mostly because maintenance and safety work required by law was not done on time. Lysyk blames the agency for being ineffective in its enforcement of elevator safety. Her report says the small number of elevator maintenance companies that dominate the market are failing to get safety work done on time, but the TSSA is having little success in cracking down.

According to her report, the safety authority deems it impractical to shut down the operating licences of the large maintenance companies – ThyssenKrupp, Kone, Schindler and Delta – no matter how poor their track record, and equally difficult to take non-compliant elevators out of service.

“Shutting down elevators to enforce compliance is also not practical,” the report states. “Unless there is an immediate risk to public safety, it only affects the building’s tenants and ends up benefiting the maintenance companies, as they often charge owners a higher rate for performing emergency repairs to bring the elevators back into service.”

Who is to blame?
The report found many building owners avoid taking on the big companies. Building owners also find it challenging to use smaller independent companies because of ironclad contracts and a requirement to use company-owned technology.

The elevator companies tend to blame building owners for being unwilling to spend money on maintenance and also cite a shortage of fully-trained technicians.

TSSA and Ministry of Government and Consumer Services response
The TSSA said in response to the auditor’s report that it was developing a new “outcomes-based regulatory approach for effectively identifying risk, increasing compliance and promoting safety.”

For its part, the Ministry of Government and Consumer Services, which is responsible for the safety authority, said it was looking to enhance its oversight processes to provide greater assurances that the TSSA is meeting its public safety mandate in the interests of the people of Ontario.

FIELDBOSS is a proud member of CECA and NAEC. We stay current on industry trends to keep you informed on what’s happening in the elevator world.  Read our blog and sign up for our newsletter  for all the latest news.

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New Release: FIELDBOSS 3.0 for HVAC Contractors

FIELDBOSS 3.0 is now available for new and existing HVAC customers!

With version 3.0 FIELDBOSS customers are now able to manage progress billing for construction projects and inventory stock levels within the system much more efficiently.

In addition to the two major functionality improvements, version 3.0 adds new features and performance enhancements that continue to streamline HVAC contractor business processes.

FIELDBOSS 3.0 for HVAC, key enhancements include:

Progress Billing

New to FIELDBOSS HVAC, Progress Billing allows project ‘phases’ to be tracked and billed as work on the phase progresses, with the system automatically managing retainage (holdback) for phases in accordance with AIA standards. This new feature also allows an ‘Application for Payment’ to be generated and sent to the customer, which can be adjusted at any time.

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New Inventory Functionality

FIELDBOSS 3.0 introduces support for inventory management integrated with Dynamics GP. New functionality allows customers to view stock levels at warehouse locations directly in Dynamics 365, and mark inventory items as allocated once the Work Order is created. Once an item is out of stock, users can receive a warning when placing a Work Order for these items.

Wage Categories

Version 3.0 extends the innovative functionality released in previous versions to further optimize the Service Activity feature by providing the ability to ensure compliance with ‘Prevailing Wages’ as required by law and/or contractual agreement. When a Time Card is completed, FIELDBOSS will use the appropriate “burdened cost” for job costing purposes. This feature is an optional extension of Labor Rate tables and can be setup and used only if needed for a specific Work Order or Project.

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Field Requests

Version 3.0 includes the ability to create a ‘Field Request’. This can be used by technicians in the field to create and track requests for services, parts, or other information on their mobile device. This request is routed to the office, which then tracks the request to completion. This feature provides the back office the ability to more effectively queue, prioritize, act and follow up on requests from the field.

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Major Update to Maintenance Contracts 

FIELDBOSS 3.0 introduces significant changes to the way Maintenance Contracts are created and managed, as well as how Maintenance Invoices are generated. In 3.0, a single Maintenance Contract can be used for many different billing cycles, including: monthly, annual, three-year and five-year on the same invoice. Additionally, a new view has been added to quickly identify contracts that are due for annual “escalations”. Maintenance invoices can now be generated for the current month or can be generated in advance for dates in the “next month”.

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There are more updates and enhancements included in these releases that are not highlighted in this blog post. And as always, we have also implemented several smaller improvements and fixes.

If you are a current customer looking to upgrade, or would just like some more information on FIELDBOSS 3.0, please contact us .

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Where Does the U.S. Stand on HFC’s Heading into 2019?

Since last year, when a U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that the EPA could not ban HFCs through its Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) program, there has been a lot of confusion around HFC’s. End users who thought they would have to transition from high-GWP HFCs to other refrigerants were suddenly given a reprieve, while states, such as California and New York, created their own HFC regulations. Many in the HVACR industry hope the U.S. simply accepts the phasedown schedule recommended in the Kigali Amendment which they have yet to ratify. So where does the U.S. stand in regards to HFCs heading into 2019?

The future of HFC controls at the federal level is unclear for a few reasons.

  1.  SNAP Ruling -The U.S Supreme Court has declined to consider a review of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit’s decision to block the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) ban on HFCs. This leaves in place the decision from last year, which overturned the EPA’s directives to ban high-GWP refrigerants such as R-404A and R-410A from use in certain applications.
  2. Kigali Amendment –The initial steps of the HFC phase-down are set to take place starting January 1st, 2019. Yes, that’s right… just a little over a month away. In order for this first step to be taken a total of twenty, or more, countries had to ratify the Kigali Amendment. Currently there are over fifty-three countries that have ratified. Some of these countries include Germany, Mexico, United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, France, Ireland, the European Union, and many more. Missing from that list is the U.S. The United States has not ratified the Kigali Amendment. It seems as though, for the United States, the Kigali Amendment has been forgotten. Businesses and many in the industry have pushed for Trump to ratify to no avail.
  3. EPA Section 608 – The EPA recently proposed to revise the Section 608 refrigerant management regulations, where it would “rescind the leak repair and maintenance requirements” for HFCs. In addition, EPA has asked for public comments on whether technicians should have Section 608 certification before being allowed to purchase or handle HFCs, as well as if there should be a requirement to recover or reclaim HFCs. Last week Fifteen U.S. states and the District of Columbia sent a letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) “strongly opposing” its proposed revisions to updated leak repair and maintenance regulations for stationary refrigeration and air conditioning equipment containing HFCs. The ACCA, America’s largest HVACR contractor group, has raised serious safety concerns over the possibility that unqualified people might be allowed to handle refrigerants. Not only would this have a negative effect on the climate, it would negatively impact the HVACR industry as a whole. If the EPA doesn’t step up and address HFCs, each state will end up with their own rules.

 

As of today, 4 states have already adopted their own HFC refrigerant regulations to compensate for the federal level activity. All of this has created a great deal of uncertainty in the industry. That’s why it is so important for the EPA to step up and decide how to regulate HFCs for the nation, because if it does not, then the HVACR industry could be exposed to a patchwork of regulations that varies from state to state. The EPA anticipates issuing a proposed rule addressing HFCs in early 2019. If the U.S. government doesn’t ratify the Kigali amendment and/or the EPA doesn’t take charge of HFC’s, expect even more refrigerant confusion in the coming years.

FIELDBOSS stays current on industry trends to keep you informed on what’s happening in the HVACR world.  Read our blog and sign up for our newsletter  for all the latest news.

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Employee Spotlight: Saadia Zakki

The Rimrock Corporation team is made up of many hard working, talented individuals with interesting stories to tell. In our Employee Spotlight series, you’ll meet some of these people, learn what they do, and how they keep Rimrock exciting and fun.

This month we shine the light on Saadia Zakki, our Project Coordinator. Saadia was born and raised in Pakistan. She spent 7 years studying and working in England before moving to Toronto in 2012. Prior to working at Rimrock, Saadia worked in various administrative and Project Management roles in several industries from Business to Food and IT services.

In her spare time, Saadia loves music, painting, baking and long nature walks.

Read on to find out more about Saadia:.

 

What do you love most about working at Rimrock & how long have you been here?
It’s just been over a month now and I am loving it here! Wonderful team to work with. I love the work life balance that Rimrock offers.

 

What is your favorite place that you have visited and where is your next dream vacation spot?
We had some friends in Leominster (South Wales, UK) and I loved visiting them. They had a lovely 18th century cottage at the bottom of the hills. It was always refreshing to take a break from fast paced city life and rediscover my own self.

Dream vacation spot is Bali!

 

If you could do another job for just one day, what would it be?

A Fire Fighter.

 

If Hollywood made a movie about your life, who would you like to see cast as you?

I would like to cast myself as ME 😊

 

What TV shows/music/apps/Podcasts are you currently obsessed with right now?
None! I hardly get any time for these with two little young ones.

 

Tell us a “fun fact” about yourself or your “secret talent” that your colleagues might not already know.

I am a good cook! (I think…..lol)

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Employee Spotlight: Tim Powers

The Rimrock Corporation team is made up of many hard working, talented individuals with interesting stories to tell. In our Employee Spotlight series, you’ll meet some of these people, learn what they do, and how they keep Rimrock exciting and fun.

This month we shine the light on Tim Powers, our Senior Software Engineer. Tim hails from Bowmanville, Ontario, where he was quite the high school jock, playing both rugby and hockey. Although Tim has only been with Rimrock since May, he is no stranger to Rimrock. A former employee, Tim worked with us in the early days from 2004-2006. He went on to work for companies including Tectura, Hewlett Packard (HP), and most recently he was the Dynamics 365 Business Solutions Advisor at Avanade. We are thrilled to have Tim back with the team.

Read on to find out more about Tim.

What do you love most about working at Rimrock?

I love that Rimrock offers an amazing work/life balance because that is something that’s really important to me and my family. I also love that I get to be a part of growing and developing the FIELDBOSS product.

What is the number one challenge you face in your role?

Deciding which enhancements should be included in software releases.

What TV shows/book/app are you currently obsessed with right now?

I just downloaded the Ancestry.ca app to learn a little more about my family history. As for TV shows, right now I’m watching a lot of little kid shows with my children 🙂 Tuesdays with Morrie is a book I really love.

If you had to eat one meal for the rest of your life what would it be?

It seems like everyone at Rimrock has the same answer for this question…..Sushi!

Tell us something about you that might surprise us.

I think it would surprise people to know that I toured Finland and Sweden with my rep Hockey team. That was such an incredible experience!

What is the first concert you ever attended?

U2- Joshua Tree

What is your favourite place to travel to?

Thailand! The food, the people, the culture, the scenery….such a beautiful place to travel.

If you could have a drink with anyone (fictional, alive, dead, famous, non-famous) who would it be and why?

Super Man because he might give me some tips on how to fly.  I would never have to wait in traffic!

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